Thursday, August 21, 2014

Montana "Wolf Stamp"

**Public Comment Period Now CLOSED**
Montana is considering having a "Wolf Management Stamp." http://fwp.mt.gov/news/publicNotices/armRules/pn_0177.html
        This stamp would "be issued to any persons who wish to donate to the department's management of wolves." Any resident or nonresident would be able to purchase one or more stamps for a donation of $20.00 each.
         Most of the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks budget comes from the sale of hunting, trapping, and fishing licenses and tags. This perhaps gives 'consumptive' (hunters, fishermen, trappers) a more skewed influence on the Department and what it can do with those funds, especially when it comes to wolf management. The proposed Wolf Management Stamp provide an additional funding source for wolf conservation and management in Montana. The stamp would give non-consumptive users (wildlife and bird watchers, etc.) the opportunity to contribute to wolf and wildlife management.
        Montana wants to know if you think this stamp is a good idea or if you think there should be any changes. It's important for both residents and nonresidents of Montana to comment, as both will be able to use the stamp.

Please submit your comment here: http://fwp.mt.gov/news/publicNotices/armRules/pn_0177.html
Comments are due Friday, August 22, 2014!

Here's a sample comment for a nonresident:

I live in _________ and visit Montana several times a year/plan to visit Montana in the future; one of the main reasons I go to Montana/plan to visit Montana is to enjoy Montana's rich array of wildlife, especially wolves, in a non-consumptive manner. I believe that the proposed Wolf Conservation Stamp is a good idea, and I know I would buy them to support Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and their efforts to coexist with wolves using methods other than lethal management. 
I would suggest a few changes; in the proposed rule, change the stamp from "wolf management stamp " to "wolf conservation stamp". Make sure that "non-lethal" is specified. These stamps should go exclusively to non-lethal wolf management, as FWP already gets its lethal management funds from consumptive users. Especially, I would like to see money go toward non-lethal proactive measures to prevent wolf/livestock conflict. I approve of the proposal's inclusion of money going towards the purchase and maintenance of wolf habitat; conducting research, education, and outreach; and hiring additional wardens to prevent poaching of wolves and other wildlife.
Thank you for this proposal that gives everyone a say in the management and conservation Montana's amazing wildlife that draws so many people from around the country.


Monday, August 4, 2014

Mexican Gray Wolves Need You

**Public Comment Period Now CLOSED**


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed changes to the management of Mexican gray wolves; some are good changes, but many are bad changes. PLEASE LEARN ABOUT THEM HERE:  http://www.mexicanwolves.org/index.php/news/1278/51/Act-Now-US-Fish-and-Wildlife-Service-Proposes-to-Doom-Mexican-Wolves

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will be taking comments from the public.
Even if you don't live in New Mexico or Arizona, you can still help this essential species by leaving your official comment here: http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FWS-R2-ES-2013-0056-6056



Brief background on "lobos:" Mexican gray wolves, also known as "lobos," are a subspecies of gray wolves. They are smaller and have very distinct, beautiful markings. They are currently the most endangered mammal in North America. Lobos used to range across southwestern North America, but like gray wolves, they were nearly completely exterminated in the United States and Mexico by the mid 1900's until only a handful remained in the wild. Thanks to a captive breeding program, this unique subspecies was saved from extinction, and lobos were reintroduced near the border of New Mexico and Arizona in 1998. Because the current population of lobos began from so few remaining wolves, lobos are continually being released into the wild to make sure the population remains genetically diverse. Even though lobos were reintroduced 16 years ago, there are still less than 90 surviving in the wild as of 2013. These few wild wolves are restricted to a certain recovery zone; if they leave this zone, they are trapped and put back into the zone.